Newspaper logo  
 
 
Local News & Opinion

Ref. : Civic Events

Ref. : Arts & Education Events

Ref. : Public Service Notices

Travel
Books, Films, Arts & Education

10.18 Why Germany Is So Much Better at Training Its Workers

10.18 For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language

Letters
Open Letters:

Ref. : Letters to the editor

Health Care & Environment

10.21 Boston University study finds possible link between traumatic brain injuries and domestic violence

10.21 Paralysed man Darek Fidyka walks again after pioneering surgery

10.20 The Ebola Wars

10.20 Amazon deforestation picking up pace, satellite data reveals

10.20 Cuba’s Impressive Role on Ebola

10.19 The Ebola crisis: Much worse to come [map graphic]

10.18 The Dutch boy mopping up a sea of plastic

10.18 US eyes buffet option in global climate talks

10.18 Fossil fuel divestment: climate change activists take aim at Australia's banks

10.18 Ebola 'could be scourge like HIV', warns John Kerry

News Media

Daily FAIR Blog
The Daily Howler

Justice Matters

10.20 Megarich Plaintiffs, Legally Adrift

10.18 How Oil and Gas Leases for Fracking Rip Off Homeowners

10.18 Stand-your-ground gun laws 'benefit whites more than blacks', experts say

US Politics, Policy & Culture

10.21 Warren Makes the Case

10.21 Texas Just Won the Right to Disenfranchise 600,000 People. It's Not the First Time. [A disgraceful history]

10.21 Yes, Mass Shootings Are Occurring More Often [graphs]

10.21 The Bottom 90 Percent: No Better Off Today Than in 1986

10.21 Can Homeless People Move Into Baltimore's Abandoned Houses?

10.21 Chart: Values of Homes Owned by African Americans Take Outsized Hit Compared to Those Owned by Whites

10.21 You might be a politician if ... you tried to defund Ebola research, only to campaign on Ebola fear

10.19 The Racist Housing Policies That Built Ferguson

10.18 Elizabeth Warren: 'We're All Looking at You, Colorado!'

10.18 The One Attack That's Working for Democrats: Bashing the Wealthy

10.17 Watch Jon Stewart slam Mitch McConnell as architect of government failure [2:40 video]

10.17 $10.10 Minimum Wage Would Save The U.S. Government $7.6 Billion A Year

10.17 Court Strikes Down Arkansas Voter ID Law

10.17 Rate of Mass Shootings Has Tripled Since 2011, Harvard Research Shows

10.17 From 'One Tough Nerd' to Embattled Governor

10.17 Southern Evangelicals: Dwindling—and Taking the GOP Edge With Them

High Crimes?
Economics, Crony Capitalism

10.20 The Feds Just Approved a New GMO Corn. Here's Why I'm Not Rejoicing

10.20 EPA: Those Bee-Killing Pesticides? They're Actually Pretty Useless

10.17 Chris Christie: New Jersey Bill Challenges Governor's Subsidies To GOP Donors

10.17 The Mixed International Picture on Poverty and Inequality

10.17 Matt Stoller: Why We Need to Break Up Amazon – and How to Do It

10.17 "More Money Than I Could Count": Mitch McConnell's Very Special Relationship With Lobbyists

International

10.21 Afghan opium poppy yield hits all-time high

10.20 The Mission

10.20 Deadly Ukraine Crash: German Intelligence Claims Pro-Russian Separatists Downed MH17

10.20 Turkey to let Iraqi Kurds reinforce Kobani as US air-drops arms

10.19 Full Show: Keeping Faith in Democracy [25:20 video]

10.19 The tech innovators of the Victorian age

10.18 The Tide Slowly Turns in Kobani

10.17 43 Mexican College Students Disappeared Weeks Ago. What Happened to Them?

10.17 Isis targets Baghdad with wave of car bombs and mortar attacks killing 150 [1:12 video]

We are a non-profit Internet-only newspaper publication founded in 1973. Your donation is essential to our survival.

You can also mail a check to:
Baltimore News Network, Inc.
P.O. Box 42581
Baltimore, MD 21284-2581
Google
This site Web
  Is the United States serious about Iran?

COMMENTARY:

Is the United States serious about Iran?

by Amil Imani
Bombing Iran will not help the cause. In fact, it will probably create either civil war, or some kind of desperate, lethal unity inside Iran. The more effective way to achieve regime change is to spend Iranian assets in the right way.
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice recently asked Congress for $85 million to support pro-democracy groups inside Iran and also to assist Iranian groups outside Iran who oppose the Islamic regime in Tehran.

It is a very kind gesture from President George W. Bush’s administration, but this program will not change anything in Iran. And it is not likely the $85 million (if Secretary Rice indeed receives it) will be used effectively and wisely.

Yet, there is no denying Bush’s intent of support. In his 2005 state of union address, he again pledged his support for the Iranian people: “And to the Iranian people, I say tonight: As you stand for your own liberty, America stands with you.”

In Iranian polls, Bush won the 2004 election by a landslide, even though in America, Bush won by only a few hundred votes. Today, Bush is sinking in American polls, but his popularity continues to climb in Iran.

Persian-speaking people have found a friend who says he cares about them. But, at this point, we must ask how serious is President Bush about Iran? Is it all words, with no action?

For five years, President Bush has consistently supported the Iranian people in his state of the union addresses. But it’s been simply a big carrot on a long stick. Or, as they say in Texas, it’s all hat and no cattle. While we have supported the president’s efforts to liberate Iraq and bring democracy to the region, we know the key to peace in Iraq and the region is in the hands of the Iranian people. As long as they are powerless to overthrow the Islamic terrorist regime in Iran, Iraq will never see the light of democracy.

America is spending over $200 million a day for the war in Iraq. In contrast, an $85 million proposal to bring change in Iran, administered over five years or more, is utterly unrealistic. After all, we are talking about the Islamic Republic of Iran—"the world's most active state sponsor of terrorism," according to the U.S. State Department.

So, how do we understand the money problem?

According to the Iranian Studies Group, an independent academic organization at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), more than one in four Iranian-Americans hold a master's or doctoral degree, the highest rate among 67 ethnic groups studied. Iranians are among the most highly educated people in the U.S. and annually contribute over $600 billion into the U.S. economy.

It would be a travesty for the Iranian opposition groups to accept a mere $85 million while the Iranian-Americans are such large contributors to the U.S. economy.

Yet, Iranian-Americans have not given big money to the cause of liberating their fellow Iranians in Iran, and the U.S. government hasn’t given any significant amount for the eradication of the world terrorist regime—the Islamic Republic of Iran. So, we’re back to square one.

But consider this: the United States holds billions of dollars of Iranian assets in U.S. banks. Why not use this financial source to support the Iranian opposition groups who will actively seek regime change in Iran? This money must be returned to its legitimate heirs, the Iranian people, inside Iran and outside Iran.

If the U.S. is serious about a regime change in Iran, if the U.S. is hoping for a democratic form of government in Iran, and if the U.S. truly advocates a broader democracy in the Middle East, the White House must turn the Iranian assets over to all the Iranian opposition groups who want democracy Iran. After all, Iranians know Iranian mentality better than any foreign governments.

It is time for the U.S. government to get serious about regime change in Iran. Bombing Iran will not help the cause. In fact, it will probably create either civil war, or some kind of desperate, lethal unity inside Iran. The more effective way to achieve regime change is to spend the Iranian assets in the right way.

We can create a secular, democratic Iranian nation with our own Iranian money, and obliterate the venomous theocratic regime in Iran—which the majority of Iranians consider to be alien occupiers. The clock is ticking and the majority of Iranians want to be free from the oppressors now. The Bush administration must stop the useless, wasteful bureaucracy and get down to the business of regime change, immediately.


Amil Imani is an Iranian-born American Citizen and pro democracy activist living in the United States of America. Imani is a columnist, literary translator, poet, and novelist who speaks out for the struggling people of his native land, Iran. His website is amilimani.com.


Copyright © 2006 The Baltimore Chronicle. All rights reserved.

Republication or redistribution of Baltimore Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without their prior written consent.

This story was published on April 24, 2006.

 


Public Service Ads: