Newspaper logo  
 
 
Local Stories, Events

Ref. : Civic Events

Ref. : Arts & Education Events

Ref. : Public Service Notices

Books, Films, Arts & Education
Letters

Ref. : Letters to the editor

Health Care & Environment

11.15  The long read:  The plastic backlash: what's behind our sudden rage – and will it make a difference? [the world wants to throw-up...]

11.15 Claws out: crab fishermen sue 30 oil firms over climate change [workers are waking-up...]

11.15 Trump administration to cut air pollution from heavy-duty trucks [behaving ignorantly again...]

11.14 Backed by Ocasio-Cortez, Youth Climate Activists Arrested in Pelosi's Office Demanding Democrats Embrace 'Green New Deal'

11.13 What would a smog-free city look like?

11.13 Global report highlights Australia’s renewables potential amid mixed signals for coal

11.13 Interior department whistleblower: Ryan Zinke hollowed out the agency

11.12  This Land is Your Land:  The Zinke effect: how the US interior department became a tool of industry [behaving ignorantly again...]

11.12 Planned Parenthood's new president warns of 'state of emergency' for women's health

11.11 Trump responds to worst fires in California’s history by threatening to withhold federal aid [behaving ignorantly again...]

11.11 Interior department sued for ‘secretive process’ in at-risk species assessment [behaving ignorantly again...]

11.11 Keystone XL pipeline: judge rules government 'jumped the gun' and orders halt [behaving ignorantly again...]

11.09 Rainforest destruction from gold mining hits all-time high in Peru

11.09 A new way to make steel could cut 5% of CO2 emissions at a stroke

11.08 Medicaid’s stunning victory

News Media Matters

Daily: FAIR Blog
The Daily Howler

US Politics, Policy & 'Culture'

11.15 Democrats Won Big. Can They Go Bold, Too? [it's about suppressing the influence and leadership by Republican-like Democrats who counsel 'íncremental' (no) change, such as Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, Hillary Clinton, Chuck Shumer and Joe Biden]

11.15 Pentagon Officials Forced to Make Fewer Public Appearances to Avoid Provoking Trump [...by revealing Trump's huuuge ignorance]

11.15 REPUBLICANS USED A BILL ABOUT WOLVES TO AVOID A VOTE ON YEMEN WAR [if there are 'defense industry' profits to be made—including congress-critter insider-trading—and political 'donations' to be had, we mustn't stop killing innocent civilians!]

11.15 Big Oil v the planet is the fight of our lives. Democrats must choose a side

11.14 The Real Florida Recount Fraud

11.14 Telling NRA #ThisIsOurLane, Doctors' Photos Show Blood-Soaked Reality of America's Gun Madness

11.14 At Freshman Orientation, Young and Growing Progressive Caucus Makes Clear It Will 'Fight Like Hell' for Bold Democratic Agenda

11.13 'You Sound Nervous': Gillum Mocks Trump as President Demands End to Florida Recount

11.13 Kyrsten Sinema wins Arizona Senate race in breakthrough for Democrats

Justice Matters

11.09 Trump administration blocks asylum claims by those crossing border illegally [Making America Less Great Again...]

High Crimes?

11.14 The Guardian view on Yemen’s misery: the west is complicit [WAR CRIMES]

11.10 US stops refuelling of Saudi-led coalition aircraft in Yemen war [But there are a few children still alive. It's too soon!]

Economics, Crony Capitalism

11.15 The Earth is in a death spiral. It will take radical action to save us [fossil fuel burning, un-recyclable plastic production/use and methane gas release must cease ASAP.]

11.14 Brexit: May tells her cabinet, this is the deal – now back me

11.11 Tax reform: down with the ‘stepped-up basis’

International & Futurism

11.15 Cuba to pull doctors out of Brazil after President-elect Bolsonaro comments [terms must be negotiated for fairness to Cuba's health professionals without disruption of healthcare for Brazil's poor]

11.14 'Appalling' Khashoggi audio shocked Saudi intelligence – Erdogan [Exposing a psychopath?]

11.14 Israel and Hamas launch hundreds of attacks in Gaza clash

11.14 Mueller seeking more details on Nigel Farage, key Russia inquiry target says

11.13 Austin's Fix for Homelessness: Tiny Houses, and Lots of Neighbors

11.13 Portugal Dared to Cast Aside Austerity. It’s Having a Major Revival.

11.13 Caravan marks one month on the road: ‘We keep on going, laughing or crying’

11.13 Letter Shows Einstein’s Prescient Concerns About ‘Dark Times’ in Germany

We are a non-profit Internet-only newspaper publication founded in 1973. Your donation is essential to our survival.

You can also mail a check to:
Baltimore News Network, Inc.
P.O. Box 42581
Baltimore, MD 21284-2581
Google
This site Web
  Robert Kenner's ''Food, Inc.''
Newspaper logo

DOCUMENTARY FILM REVIEW:

Robert Kenner's "Food, Inc."

Big guys and little guys and what we have to eat

by Chris Knipp
7 July 2009

The film shows how a handful of companies have come to control not only most of the beef, pork, chicken, and corn produced in the US but most other food products as well.

The message of the new documentary film "Food, Inc." is that most of what Americans now eat is produced by a handful of highly centralized mega-businesses and that this situation is increasingly detrimental to our health, to the environment, to our very humanity. The ugly facts of animal mistreatment, food contamination, and government collusion are covered up by a secretive industry that wouldn't talk to the filmmakers or let the interiors of their chicken farms, cattle ranches, slaughterhouses, and meatpacking plants be filmed.

Informed by the voices and outlook of bestseller authors Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation) and Michael Pollen (The Omnivore's Dilemma), this new film is an exposé that offers some hope that things can be made better through grassroots efforts. True, Kenner points out, Monsanto, Smithfield, Purdue, et al. are rich and powerful. But so were the tobacco companies, and if Philip Morris and Reynolds could be fought successfully, so can the food industry. The fact that the vast Walmart is switching to organic foods because customers want them shows people vote effectively with their pocketbooks every time they buy the fixings for a meal.

Other documentaries have covered much of this ground before. The 2008 French documentary "The World According to Monsanto" (2008) focused on how that company, with government support, monopolizes seed planting, and Deborah Koons' 2004 The Future of Food went over similar ground. Jennifer Abbott and Mark Achbar's sweeping 2003 film "The Corporation" (2003) touched on Monsanto's monopoly too. In more general terms, the ominous, narration-free German documentary "Our Daily Bread" (Nikolaus Geyrhalter, 2003) delivered "Food, Inc."'s message about dehumanized factory-style food production with a European focus. Richard Linklater's 2006 "Fast Food Nation" grew out of Schlosser's book about how bad and disgusting American fast food is and how it undermines the health. These are all provocative and informative films, and there are and will be lots more. As this new film mentions, exploitation and malpractice in the meat industry were exposed as far back as Upton Sinclair's 1906 muckraking book, The Jungle.

Where "Food, Inc." stands out is that it's a populist and down-to-earth film that speaks with the voices of farmers, advocates, and journalists, and focuses on food, what's wrong with it, and what we can do about it. Kenner offers lots of practical information and appeals to everyday people.

Kenner goes back to the Fifties to show how much fast food has contributed to food production that's more and more centralized and less and less diverse. Macdonald's is the biggest American purchaser of chicken, beef, potatoes, and many other foods. The film shows how a handful of companies have come to control not only most of the beef, pork, chicken, and corn produced in the US but most other food products as well. A surprising amount of the tens of thousands of products sold at today's supermarket—that packaged junk racked in the center of the store that Dr. Atkins and now Prof. Pollen have told us to avoid—all comes from corn. Corn is the dominant food fed to livestock too. Because of the way certain food products have government support, fast food hamburgers wind up being a cheaper way to fill your tummy than fresh fruits and vegetables. Kenner focuses on the low-income Mexican-American Orozco family in California. The two working parents know the value of home-cooked meals from fresh ingredients but feel forced to rely on fast food meals because they fill them and their kids more economically and quickly than fresh produce in the supermarket, which they look at wistfully before returning to Burger King.

They've lived a lousy life, these animals we eat, crammed together in great numbers, filled with antibiotics, deformed, suffering, ankle deep in their own excrement, then brutally killed.

The new industry has developed chickens that grow bigger and faster and have more breast meat. They're kept in closed dark pens. The story is the same for all those many other poor critters raised under the aegis of food monopolies whose meat is made to look neutral and then fed to us in the pretense that they came from a cute little farm. They've lived a lousy life, these animals, crammed together in great numbers, filled with antibiotics, deformed, suffering, ankle deep in their own excrement, then brutally killed. And the workers in the food factories aren't treated much better. The film has revealing reportage about the big southern meat producer Smithfield showing how the new mega-food industry feeds off of exploited low-wage illegal immigrants who it treats as expendable, just like the animals.

Cattle weren't meant to live on corn, and doing so has led to infection. The industry solution to such problems is not to change back to earlier methods, but to add more chemicals.

An important voice of sanity and hope in "Food, Inc." is organic farmer Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm in Swoope, Virginia, who's also an author, though the movie doesn't mention his books. His cattle are grass-fed, and watching them graze, we realize that's the way it's meant to be. Salatin's cattle roam free and live a healthy life while feeding themselves and trimming back the grass and fertilizing it. Cattle weren't meant to live on corn, and doing so has led to infection. The industry solution to such problems is not to change back to earlier methods, but to add more chemicals. They're even adding bleach to hamburger filler to keep the burgers from being poison.

Farmers in thrall to big companies are kept in debt like indentured servants. It's surprisingly medieval.

It's hard to keep a balance in such a documentary, but Kenner tries. That Hispanic family is important. Slow food and organics have been a thing of the rich, as their dilemma illustrates. There could be more focus on everyday people and their difficult daily choices. The Walmart story is important too: Walmart customers are everyday people. It's easy enough for well-heeled families to buy boutique produce at farmers' markets. Average Joes don't have the time or the money for that. Also important is Barbara Kowalcyk, who works in Washington with her mother as an advocate for stricter laws. Her 2 1/2-year-old son Kevin died in 12 days from a virulent form of E. coli after eating a hamburger on vacation. She wants not sympathy but control of an indifferent industry. Carole Morison is another vivid voice: she is a southern chicken farmer who lost her contract with Perdue for refusing to switch to dark enclosed tunnel chicken coops, the latest in a series of enforced "improvements" that lead to more production at the cost of more cruelty. She also explains how the farmers in thrall to these big companies are kept in debt like indentured servants. It's surprisingly medieval—except in the Middle Ages serfs lived in a more natural relationship to the land.

Armed with witty, clear graphics and ironically bright color, "Food, Inc." has a chance of gaining more converts to "slow," organic, local food and inspiring more opponents of crooked food regulation and our monopolistic industry. This seems one of the most balanced and humane treatments of the subject yet.


The Atlantic review by Corby Kummer talks about more of the people featured in the documentary.

Video of a Fox/Monsanto exposé: some fired Fox reporters tell how their story about contaminated milk was killed by Fox under pressure from the chemical giant.

©Chris Knipp 2009. The author writes from San Francisco. See more of his work on his website.



Copyright © 2009 The Baltimore News Network. All rights reserved.

Republication or redistribution of Baltimore Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without their prior written consent.

Baltimore News Network, Inc., sponsor of this web site, is a nonprofit organization and does not make political endorsements. The opinions expressed in stories posted on this web site are the authors' own.

This story was published on July 7, 2009.

 

Public Service Ads: