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Health Care & Environment

11.25 Experts discuss how to build a carbon-free energy industry

11.25 Somaliland stricken by drought: 'We need what all humans need'

11.25 What can the world learn from Växjö, Europe's self-styled greenest city?

11.24 Weather disasters occurred almost daily over last decade, UN says

11.24 Most of Britain's major cities pledge to run on green energy by 2050

11.23 The Gene Hackers

11.23 Wind from Britain, solar from the Sahara, geothermal from Iceland

11.23 Alberta to introduce carbon tax

11.23 First EPA chief accuses Republicans of ignoring science for political gain

11.23 Climate change and the Republican party: 'America is not a planet'

11.23 World trade has an important role in combating climate change

11.23 The Guardian view on antibiotic resistance: a clear and present danger

News Media Matters

Daily: FAIR Blog
The Daily Howler

US Politics, Policy & 'Culture'

11.25 Why white people aren’t called “terrorist”: The media accepts that “people who resort to violence are left-wing or Arab or both” [fighting to change a racist culture head-on]

11.24 Five people shot at Black Lives Matter protest in Minneapolis: Police

11.24 8,855 Murders by Firearm in US in 2012 vs. 30 (Equiv. 164) in UK [graphics, video]

11.24 Part 4: A reservation town fighting alcoholism, obesity and ghosts from the past

11.24 Donald Trump doesn't care what's true, just what his base feels is true

11.24 Republicans think being pro-family means forcing women to have babies

11.23 This is why we’re so f*cked: Our politics are only going to get worse

11.23 5 worst right-wing moments of the week — The Donald goes full fascist

11.23 Louisiana Just Voted to Give a Quarter of a Million People Health Care

11.23 Shooting in New Orleans park leaves at least 16 people wounded [normal, move along folks...]

Justice Matters

11.22 West Virginia mine explosion trial showcases challenge of jailing a CEO

High Crimes?

11.24 Saudi Arabia: Poet Sentenced to Death for Apostasy [Saudi Arabia: an ISIS-like Islamist theocracy...]

Economics, Crony Capitalism

11.25 Fossil fuel companies risk wasting $2tn of investors' money, study says

11.23 Pfizer and Allergan poised to announce history's biggest healthcare merger

11.22 Hang Onto Your Wallets: Negative Interest, the War on Cash, and the $10 Trillion Bail-in


11.25 Who owns our cities – and why this urban takeover should concern us all

11.25 Angela Merkel stands by refugee policy despite security fears

11.25 Cultural figures and rights groups call for release of poet facing execution [fighting to change a barbaric Islamist culture head-on]

11.25 Manuel Valls: the French PM taking a hard line against terror

11.24 Muslims are integrated in France, but the bad guys want a clash of civilizations

11.24 Turkish military official says fighter jets destroyed plane after it violated country’s airspace, which Russia denies

11.24 Government ‘must do more to help vulnerable households this winter’

11.23 Beijing Replaced This Huge Bridge in Only 43 Hours

11.23 Paris suspect Salah Abdeslam still on run after Belgian police raids [1:35 video]

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This site Web
  Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science
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Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science

Offers first glimpse of federal flu plan

by Jim Dawson
Inside Science News Service

Scientists say that so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

August 13, 2009 • Washington (ISNS)The 21 members of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) crowded into a small conference center across the street from the White House last week to review the science that will be on the agenda of President Barack Obama's administration for the next several months.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

First on the agenda was a summary of a quick two-week study done in late June to assess how prepared the country is for the expected return of the H1N1 virus.

The study will be released in the next few days and will provide "an integrated set of recommendations to aid in our response [to the flu's return]," said Eric Lander, a co-chair of PCAST. He said the report contains "strong suggestions for concrete scenario planning, a review of the current surveillance system [to detect outbreaks], and a look at what barriers to a rapid response might exist."

Harold Varmus, another PCAST co-chair and the former head of the National Institutes of Health, said studies of the H1N1 virus have found that only nine varieties out of hundreds are resistant to the vaccine under development. Varmus said that while there is concern that the H1N1 virus is following a pattern similar to the devastating 1918 Spanish flu virus—mild in the spring and deadly upon its return in the fall—so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

Langer said the scenarios used to forecast the flu's spread include the most likely events. The extreme possibilities have been discussed, but not developed in detail. Agencies across the federal government are working together, he said, "and lines of communication have been clarified. We want to engage the entire country." The goal, he said, is for federal, state, and local governments to "think this through and make sure we're all on the same page."

Next on the agenda was plant evolutionary biologist and PCAST member Barbara Schaal, who said her council subcommittee is focusing on agriculture in relation to global warming, obesity, and safety. As the climate changes, she said, researchers need to find a way to sustain agricultural output. To combat obesity, she said, the question that needs to be asked is, "can agriculture produce foods that are helpful?" She also discussed food safety issues such as reducing the amount of E. coli and other bacterial contamination in food.

University of Maryland physicist S. James Gates Jr. said his group is working on improving K-12 science and technology education, an area the U.S. has been neglecting for more than a decade. "But we don't want to replicate activities that have been done before," Gates said. "We're looking for unique opportunities." They are examining innovative schools that have good science programs in the hopes of modeling their success on a broader scale.

Other reports focused on energy and security, using robotics and nanotechnology to improve manufacturing, the impact of rapidly changing technology on the U.S. economy, and the role of science and technology in international security.

This article is provided courtesy of Inside Science News Service, which is supported by the American Institute of Physics, a not-for-profit publisher of scientific journals. Contact: Martha Heil, editor, 301-209-3086,

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This story was published on August 13, 2009.

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