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Health Care & Environment

10.24 Inside big pharma's fight to block recreational marijuana

10.24 We sent a vegetarian to see if meatless burgers can convert carnivores

10.23 Dear Donald Trump: I'm an OB-GYN. There are no 9-month abortions.

10.23 China’s Wind Co. Profits, share price soar by 60%: 2 Turbines an Hour being Installed

10.23 The world’s first tidal energy farm could power 175,000 homes [similar project is underway in the Bay of Fundy]

10.22 Law to cut sex-selective abortions in Armenia 'putting lives at risk'

10.22 US energy shakeup continues as solar capacity set to triple

10.22 A three-bed house with £500 energy bills? How you too can slash your costs

10.22 Highlighting Damage of Lack of Clinic Funding, CDC Says STDs at All-Time High

10.22 Three Massive Mergers—Millions for One Bank and a Disaster for Food, Water, and Climate

10.21 Hillary Clinton vs Donald Trump on science, energy, and the climate

10.21 That's 4 straight debates without a single question on climate change. Good job, everyone.

10.21 Bottled Water or Tap: How Much Does Your Choice Matter?

10.21 We are approaching the Trumpocene, a new epoch where climate change is just a big scary conspiracy

10.21 Global warming continues; 2016 will be the hottest year ever recorded

10.21 Onshore windfarms more popular than thought, UK poll finds

10.21 Europe's offshore wind industry booming as costs fall

News Media Matters

10.23 The Crackdown on Dakota Access Pipeline Reporters Shows the Vital Role of Independent Media

10.23 How media outlets from around the world are reacting to the presidential campaign

10.22 Documentary film-makers face decades in prison for taping oil pipeline protests

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US Politics, Policy & 'Culture'

10.23 AIR TRUMP: A SHORT PLAY [parody]


10.22 The Huge Corporate Tax Cut Hillary Clinton Doesn’t Talk About [is double-taxation on foreign income normal or out of step?]

10.22 Bernie Looks Ahead

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10.24 Police and hired assassins are killing land rights defenders. Let's end this violence

10.24 Tunisian coalition party fights for women's rights with gender violence bill

10.22 Senators Want to Know: Who's Actually Being Held Accountable at Wells Fargo?


10.20 Mass incarceration in America, explained in 22 maps and charts

High Crimes?

10.24 Philippines senator calls for Duterte to face crimes against humanity inquiry

Economics, Crony Capitalism

10.24 How Democrats Killed Their Populist Soul

10.24 Elizabeth Warren Warns Democrats Not To Cave On Corporate Tax Reform

10.23 Super-size my superyacht: the quest for bigger boats and gadgets


10.22 We Never Voted for Corporate Rule

10.21 Capitalism Is Doomed — Without Alternatives, So Are We


10.24 The Turks want Mosul and Aleppo "back."

10.24 Diary

10.24 Young, female and determined: how millennial social entrepreneurs are changing the world

10.24 Q&A: what happens now to the Calais refugees?

10.23 America, land of opportunity? Not for young people, study says

10.20 Elon Musk says fully self-driving Tesla cars already being built

10.19 Everything You Need to Know About the Momentous Habitat III

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  Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science
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Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science

Offers first glimpse of federal flu plan

by Jim Dawson
Inside Science News Service

Scientists say that so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

August 13, 2009 • Washington (ISNS)The 21 members of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) crowded into a small conference center across the street from the White House last week to review the science that will be on the agenda of President Barack Obama's administration for the next several months.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

First on the agenda was a summary of a quick two-week study done in late June to assess how prepared the country is for the expected return of the H1N1 virus.

The study will be released in the next few days and will provide "an integrated set of recommendations to aid in our response [to the flu's return]," said Eric Lander, a co-chair of PCAST. He said the report contains "strong suggestions for concrete scenario planning, a review of the current surveillance system [to detect outbreaks], and a look at what barriers to a rapid response might exist."

Harold Varmus, another PCAST co-chair and the former head of the National Institutes of Health, said studies of the H1N1 virus have found that only nine varieties out of hundreds are resistant to the vaccine under development. Varmus said that while there is concern that the H1N1 virus is following a pattern similar to the devastating 1918 Spanish flu virus—mild in the spring and deadly upon its return in the fall—so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

Langer said the scenarios used to forecast the flu's spread include the most likely events. The extreme possibilities have been discussed, but not developed in detail. Agencies across the federal government are working together, he said, "and lines of communication have been clarified. We want to engage the entire country." The goal, he said, is for federal, state, and local governments to "think this through and make sure we're all on the same page."

Next on the agenda was plant evolutionary biologist and PCAST member Barbara Schaal, who said her council subcommittee is focusing on agriculture in relation to global warming, obesity, and safety. As the climate changes, she said, researchers need to find a way to sustain agricultural output. To combat obesity, she said, the question that needs to be asked is, "can agriculture produce foods that are helpful?" She also discussed food safety issues such as reducing the amount of E. coli and other bacterial contamination in food.

University of Maryland physicist S. James Gates Jr. said his group is working on improving K-12 science and technology education, an area the U.S. has been neglecting for more than a decade. "But we don't want to replicate activities that have been done before," Gates said. "We're looking for unique opportunities." They are examining innovative schools that have good science programs in the hopes of modeling their success on a broader scale.

Other reports focused on energy and security, using robotics and nanotechnology to improve manufacturing, the impact of rapidly changing technology on the U.S. economy, and the role of science and technology in international security.

This article is provided courtesy of Inside Science News Service, which is supported by the American Institute of Physics, a not-for-profit publisher of scientific journals. Contact: Martha Heil, editor, 301-209-3086,

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This story was published on August 13, 2009.

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