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03.26 Natural gas leaks from power plants, refineries, 100 times greater than thought

03.25 THE PLANT NEXT DOOR

03.25 Colorado Youth Score Decisive Legal Victory Against Fracking Industry

03.25 Keystone XL: Trump issues permit to begin construction of pipeline ["Stupid is as stupid does." –Forrest Gump]

03.25 Rotavirus vaccine could save lives of almost 500,000 children a year

03.24 How Corruption Fuels Climate Change

03.24 ‘Moore’s law’ for carbon would defeat global warming

03.24 A river of rubbish: the ugly secret threatening China's most beautiful city

03.24 Europe poised for total ban on bee-harming pesticides

News Media Matters

03.27 PBS is the only network reporting on climate change. Trump wants to cut it

Daily: FAIR Blog
The Daily Howler

US Politics, Policy & 'Culture'

03.28 The Feuding Kleptocrats

03.28 Trump signs four bills to roll back Obama-era regulations

03.28 A white supremacist slew a man in Manhattan. Why is the president silent?

03.28 Is the US facing an epidemic of 'deaths of despair'? These researchers say yes

03.28 The Trump Administration’s War on Science

03.27 How the Disappearing Middle Class Threatens Our Democracy [Citizen's United ruling is ruining America]

03.27 How the Disappearing Middle Class Threatens Our Democracy

03.27 'Whoa, Whoa, Whoa': Sanders Says Democrats' Intransigence Is Solution, Not Problem [videos]

03.27 The DLC Lives: "Third Way" Democrats Are Trying to Push the Party Rightward

03.27 Donald Trump's dizzying Time magazine interview was 'Trumpspeak' on display

03.27 Protesters target Connecticut's uber wealthy with 'tax bills' in bid to end loophole

03.27 'People aren't spending': stores close doors in 'oversaturated' US retail market

03.26 'Follow the Facts': Top Dem Demands Independent Trump-Russia Commission

03.26 Nearly 15% of female undergraduates at UT Austin report being raped [does sociopathic behavior come from right-wing media?]

03.26 Neil Gorsuch's confirmation hearing revealed his hidden similarity to Trump

03.26 The showdown that exposed the rift between Republican ideology and reality

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03.24 TRUMP’S RUSSIA PROBLEM IS FAR FROM MARGINAL

High Crimes?

03.26 Iraq suspends Mosul offensive after coalition airstrike atrocity

03.25 The US Is Bombing Syria So Much That Watchdogs Can't Keep Up

03.25 Mosul's children were shouting beneath the rubble. Nobody came

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03.25 Wall Street First

03.23 Bank that lent $300m to Trump linked to Russian money laundering scam

International

03.28 Negotiations to ban nuclear weapons begin, but Australia joins US boycott

03.27 Two Years of Uncertainty: Europe Prepares for Tough Brexit Negotiations

03.27 Left Behind: Germany's Race to Catch Up in the Startup World

03.27 A Wounded Metropolis: London in the Age of Terror and Brexit

03.26 Foreign companies flock to build nuclear plants in the UK [what could go wrong?]

03.26 Congolese militia decapitates more than 40 policemen as violence grows

03.26 Africans are rising - we can hold our leaders to account and build a better kind of future

03.26 Rise of Hindu ‘extremist’ spooks Muslim minority in India’s heartland

03.26 Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron face off for the soul of France

03.26 'A runaway crisis': Argentina activists aid shanty towns state has left behind

03.26 In war-scarred Gaza, water pollution behind health woes

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  Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science
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REPORT:

Obama Team Sets the Stage for Science

Offers first glimpse of federal flu plan

by Jim Dawson
Inside Science News Service

Scientists say that so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

August 13, 2009 • Washington (ISNS)The 21 members of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) crowded into a small conference center across the street from the White House last week to review the science that will be on the agenda of President Barack Obama's administration for the next several months.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

The group covered a wide array of topics ranging from the federal government's response to the anticipated return of the swine flu virus this fall to changes in agricultural practices that might be required to deal with the effects of climate change.

First on the agenda was a summary of a quick two-week study done in late June to assess how prepared the country is for the expected return of the H1N1 virus.

The study will be released in the next few days and will provide "an integrated set of recommendations to aid in our response [to the flu's return]," said Eric Lander, a co-chair of PCAST. He said the report contains "strong suggestions for concrete scenario planning, a review of the current surveillance system [to detect outbreaks], and a look at what barriers to a rapid response might exist."

Harold Varmus, another PCAST co-chair and the former head of the National Institutes of Health, said studies of the H1N1 virus have found that only nine varieties out of hundreds are resistant to the vaccine under development. Varmus said that while there is concern that the H1N1 virus is following a pattern similar to the devastating 1918 Spanish flu virus—mild in the spring and deadly upon its return in the fall—so far there is no indication that the H1N1 virus will become more dangerous.

Langer said the scenarios used to forecast the flu's spread include the most likely events. The extreme possibilities have been discussed, but not developed in detail. Agencies across the federal government are working together, he said, "and lines of communication have been clarified. We want to engage the entire country." The goal, he said, is for federal, state, and local governments to "think this through and make sure we're all on the same page."

Next on the agenda was plant evolutionary biologist and PCAST member Barbara Schaal, who said her council subcommittee is focusing on agriculture in relation to global warming, obesity, and safety. As the climate changes, she said, researchers need to find a way to sustain agricultural output. To combat obesity, she said, the question that needs to be asked is, "can agriculture produce foods that are helpful?" She also discussed food safety issues such as reducing the amount of E. coli and other bacterial contamination in food.

University of Maryland physicist S. James Gates Jr. said his group is working on improving K-12 science and technology education, an area the U.S. has been neglecting for more than a decade. "But we don't want to replicate activities that have been done before," Gates said. "We're looking for unique opportunities." They are examining innovative schools that have good science programs in the hopes of modeling their success on a broader scale.

Other reports focused on energy and security, using robotics and nanotechnology to improve manufacturing, the impact of rapidly changing technology on the U.S. economy, and the role of science and technology in international security.


This article is provided courtesy of Inside Science News Service, which is supported by the American Institute of Physics, a not-for-profit publisher of scientific journals. Contact: Martha Heil, editor, 301-209-3086, mheil@aip.org.



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This story was published on August 13, 2009.
 

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