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05.28 Could Alzheimer’s Stem From Infections? It Makes Sense, Experts Say

05.28 The Rogue Immune Cells That Wreck the Brain

05.28 Revealed: report for Unesco on the Great Barrier Reef that Australia didn't want world to see

05.28 Trump's climate claims: experts analyze Republican's energy policy remarks

05.27 Trump puts fossil fuels at US energy core [“Stupid is as stupid does.”  —Forrest Gump]

05.27 Teen cancer death rate causes alarm [it's from pollution, of course]

05.27 The west country cheddar maker powered by solar and cow dung

05.27 ExxonMobil is in its climate change bunker and won’t let reality in

05.26 Pollution From Canadian Oil Sands Vapor Is Substantial, Study Finds

05.26 Australia's dirtiest power station may be closed or sold, French owner says

05.26 FDA to announce whether it will approve implant for opioid addicts

05.25 How cracking down on America's painkiller capital led to a heroin crisis [As seen in Portugal and elsewhere, physicians prescribing safer, dosage-controlled drugs to addicts would save lives and suppress illegal drug cartels]

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05.27 Journalists blast NY Times for pro-Israel bias and “grotesque” distortion of illegal occupation of Palestine

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05.28 The Stadium Boondoggle Is Migrating to the Suburbs

05.28 Federal Help for Poor Families With Children Is Evaporating [euthanasia might be more humane]

05.28 Bill Maher And Bernie Sanders Take Down ‘Chicken’ Donald Trump [11:24 video]

05.28 Meet the Bernie-Endorsed Law Professor Trying to Unseat the DNC Chair

05.28 Green Party's Jill Stein on the Feminist Case Against Hillary Clinton

05.28 Green Party's Jill Stein on the Feminist Case Against Hillary Clinton

05.28 How America Lost Its Mojo

05.28 Why the Left will divorce Hillary and the new Democratic Party

05.28 Tavis Smiley interviews Bernie Sanders [26:21 video]

05.28 Trump Says No Debate After Sanders Says Networks Interested

05.28 Protesters clash with police outside Donald Trump rally in San Diego [0:44 video]

05.27 Sanders to Trump: Let's Debate in 'Biggest Stadium Possible'

05.27 Sanders’ DNC platform team pushes for Palestinian rights, blasts Israeli war crimes

05.26 The Hourly Wage Needed to Rent a 2-Bedroom Apartment Is Rising

05.26 They don’t want Trump or Hillary: Half of voters would consider a third-party presidential candidate

05.26 Elizabeth Warren labels Trump 'money-grubber' who rooted for financial crash [videos]

05.26 “Come with me if you want to live”: Morning Joe panel gets weird, claims white men trust Trump to protect them from robots [governments, as yet, have no plan, policy or response to rapid robotic automation that's certain to replace millions of workers]

05.26 State Department audit finds Hillary Clinton broke agency rules with private email server

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05.28 Argentina's last military dictator jailed for role in international death squad

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05.28 Austerity policies do more harm than good, IMF study concludes

05.27 Revealed: 9% rise in London properties owned by offshore firms

05.27 Bernie Sanders Easily Wins the Policy Debate

05.26 Average CEO Raise Last Year Amounted to 10x What Most Workers Make in Total

05.25 The Pentagon’s War on Accountability

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05.28 Israeli Ex-Officers Issue Peace Plan, Condemn Gov't Inaction

05.27 Story of cities #future: what will our growing megacities really look like?

05.27 Story of cities #50: the reclaimed stream bringing life to the heart of Seoul

05.27 Riot police crack down on Paris protests against labour reforms

05.26 Is this the world’s most radical mayor?

05.26 Operation Condor conspiracy faces day of judgment in Argentina court

05.26 Brazil senate head recorded proposing to weaken bribes investigation

05.26 'There are two governments': Mexican elections held in shadow of the cartels

05.26 Foxconn replaces 60,000 humans with robots in China

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  It Takes Government to Create a Reading Crisis

COMMENTARY:

It Takes Government to Create a Reading Crisis

by Sheldon Richman
Despite what the state's teachers and experts might imply, learning to read is not that difficult. Children used to teach themselves with only light guidance from a parent. It takes a government to create a national reading crisis.
When Horace Mann and his colleagues launched the public-school movement some 175 years ago, they made extravagant promises. Turn the education of children over to enlightened altruistic experts working under government auspices, they said, and illiteracy, vice, and crime will become things of the past.

I'm not kidding.

Most people don't know about these promises, so they don't know how badly the government's schools have failed by their own standards. Apologists for state schooling often defend their abysmal record by saying that no one should expect the government's teachers and administrators to efficiently educate children who bring all of society's problems with them to the classroom. But that's what the founders of what used to be called the "common school" pledged.

The broken promises continue. The schools have a hard time teaching reading. Consider the U.S. Department of Education's latest literacy figures. The department's press release began thus: "American adults can read a newspaper or magazine about as well as they could a decade ago, but have made significant strides in performing literacy tasks that involve computation, according to the first national study of adult literacy since 1992." Of course, this raises the question of how well adults could read a newspaper or magazine a decade ago. Therein lies the tale.

The department defines literacy as "using printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one's goals, and to develop one's knowledge and potential." Now let's look at what percentage of high-school graduates, college graduates, and graduate-school students and degree-holders qualified as "proficient" in the three kinds of tasks used in the study. The three tasks are "prose," able to perform tasks using continuous texts; "document," able to perform tasks using noncontinuous texts in different formats; and "quantitative," able to do computations with numbers embedded in printed material. "Proficiency" is defined as having the "skills necessary to perform more complex and challenging literacy activities."

According to the study, in 1992, 5.3 percent of the high-school graduates tested were proficient in the three kinds of tasks. In the latest study (2003) this percentage dropped to 4.6.

For college graduates the percentages were 36 in 1992 and 29 in 2003.

For graduate students or holders of graduate degrees, the percentage went from 45 to 36.

When the three kinds of tasks are broken down, we find no improvement in the ten years. The best that can be said is that in a couple of categories, the results were unchanged.

Results were slightly different for changes in the "intermediate" literacy category, defined as having skills to perform "moderately challenging literacy activities." The percentage of high-school graduates in this category declined slightly from 44 to 42 in the ten years. For college graduates and graduate-level students, there were increases, from 48 to 53 for the former category and from 45 to 50 for the latter.

When you look at the percentages in the basic literacy and below-basic categories for high-school and college graduates and graduate-level students, the results are downright depressing. In many cases the ranks of these categories have grown; in others they improved a little or stayed the same.

This is hardly a ringing endorsement of government schooling. Despite what the state's teachers and experts might imply, learning to read is not that difficult. Children used to teach themselves with only light guidance from a parent. It takes a government to create a national reading crisis.

These results will undoubtedly be used to justify more government spending on education. President Bush is proposing more than a $100 million to promote education in foreign languages--in the name of fighting terrorism. (Oh, please!) It is time we stopped being fooled by the people who are responsible for the education mess. As if we needed more evidence, this latest study shows that it's time to separate school and state.


Sheldon Richman is senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation (fff.org) in Fairfax, Va., author of Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State, and editor of The Freeman magazine.


Copyright © 2006 The Baltimore Chronicle. All rights reserved.

Republication or redistribution of Baltimore Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without their prior written consent.

This story was published on January 12, 2006.

 

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